The Case for Ireland Re-Stated, To the President of the United States of America. With Explanatory Historical Points. 1918

photo of The Case for Ireland Re-Stated, To the President of the United States of America. With Explanatory Historical Points. 1918

View Preview

Ref: IE0372
ISBN: 1-84630-606-X
Pages: 44
Size: 39.91 MB

What is inside?

Re-published here is the historical document, The Case for Ireland Re-Stated, To the President of the United States of America. With Explanatory Historical Points, which is both the resolution made at the Mansion House by the Lord Mayor of Dublin and delegates and also the delegation's subsequent address to the President of the United States of America, Woodrow Wilson, made on 18th April 1918. The forward to The Case for Ireland Re-Stated explains why the Mansion House Conference took place: In 1918 it was proposed for the first time in the history of Ireland to render natives of the Country liable for enforced Military Service. A Conference of Delegates representative of the majority of Irish Political and Labour Organisations assembled at the Mansion House, Dublin, on Thursday 18th April, and traversed the right of the Government to apply Conscription to Ireland. The Conference was held after the Lord Mayor of Dublin, Lawrence O'Neill, acted on a resolution posited by the Corporation of the City of Dublin, to resist conscription and according inaugurated and convened the 'Anti-Conscription Committee', whose task it was to devise plans to resist conscription. The Committee consisted of John Dillon, Joseph Devlin, Eamon de Valera, Arthur Griffith, William O'Brien, Timothy Michael Healy, Michael Egan, Thomas Johnson and W. X. O'Brien. On the same evening the Catholic Bishops of Ireland also met and after deliberation with the Anti-Conscription Committee agreed to deliver the 'same statement on conscription', which took the form of a pledge that was to be taken at the door of every parish church on the following Sunday, 21st April. The pledge read as follows: Denying the right of the British government to enforce compulsory service in this country, we pledge ourselves solemnly to one another to resist conscription by the most effective means at our disposal. A general strike and massive rallies followed in the wake of the Mansion House Conference and on 11th June the Lord Mayor of Dublin, Lawrence O'Neill, wrote to the President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson, asking for his support for Ireland against conscription. The Case for Ireland Re-Stated begins with O'Neill's letter to Wilson, which is followed by Historical Points Supplementing The Case for Ireland Re-Stated by Crawford Hartnell. The pamphlet is concluded with the American Declaration of Independence, facsimiles of the signatories to the Declaration and photographs of the nine members of the Anti-Conscription Committee.

Comments

There are no comments yet

Related Products

D'Alton's History of Dublin (1838)

16

€ 17.82

Read more

Calendar of Ancient Records of Dublin Vol II, 1891

701

€ 3.00

Read more

Researching your family history?

We can help

Join for free